Blue Herons

Up to nine subspecies of heron have been recognized by past researchers, based on differences in plumage color and morphology.

Young blue herons resemble a character out of a science fiction movie. Their long lanky legs and out of control wings give the appearance of a vehicle out of control heading for the ditch. But don't be fooled, the beak is honed to penetrate those fish in the boat with accuracy. Wildlife rehabilitators watch their eyes very carefully when handling one of these birds.

Up to nine subspecies of heron have been recognized by past researchers, based on differences in plumage color and morphology. Researchers have agreed that Florida’s Great White Heron, the subspecies most distinctive in color (entirely white), and the Pacific Great Blue Heron are distinct subspecies.


Recent reviews have suggested that the remaining Great Blue Herons in North America are composed of either one or two subspecies. Owing to this controversy, this account primarily considers ‘blue group’ Great Blue usually referred to as the Herodias (or blue) group, and ‘white group’ Great Blue Herons - the Great White Heron referred to here as the Occidentalis (white) group Great Blue Herons.


Equally at home in coastal (marine) environments and in fresh water habitats, the Great Blue Heron nests mostly in colonies, commonly large ones of several hundred pairs. Such colonies are often located on islands or in wooded swamps, isolated locations that discourage predation by snakes and mammals and disturbance from humans.


Although the species is primarily a fish eater, wading (often belly deep) along the shoreline of oceans, marshes, lakes, and rivers, it also stalks upland areas for rodents and other animals, especially in winter. It has been known to eat most animals that come within striking range.


Its well-studied, elaborate courtship displays have correlates on the foraging grounds, where this species can be strongly territorial.


The Great Blue Heron weathered the impacts of 20th century North Americans relatively successfully. Although it was hunted heavily for its plumes and some of its wetland habitats were drained or otherwise degraded, many populations have recovered well. Nevertheless, breeding colonies remain vulnerable to disturbance and habitat loss, and climate change and increasing predator populations may bring new challenges.

0 views
Recent Articles
footerL.gif
Hours

Public Viewing 

9am-4:30pm 7 days a week

 Emergencies ONLY: 250-927-6025 

Year-Round Wildlife Drop-Off

  • Staff are on-site 9am – 5pm daily. 

  • After hours: Place wildlife in the red animal admissions drop-off building (east end of parking lot).

Contact Us: wildlife@niwra.org

Phone: 250-248-8534

Address: 1240 Leffler Road, Errington, BC  CANADA

footerC.gif

Sign Up
For Our Newsletter

Keep up to date with our news and activities.

  • social-facebookWH
  • social-twitterWH
  • social-youtubeWH
  • social-instagramWH
  • social-tripadvisorWH
  • social-emailWH
footerR.gif

© 2020 North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre  |  Terms & Conditions  |  Privacy Policy